Blog Archives

The Depressing Burden of Mediocrity

I have come to a depressing, but inescapable conclusion.

No one wants to be exceptional anymore.

With very few exceptions (sports, maybe the arts), no one wants to stand out above their peers, and certainly no one wants to be accused of being exceptional in their field. Mediocrity has become the new obsession. Viva la vanilla.

I am reminded of a scene in one of my favorite movies. I cannot remember the script verbatim, but I can come close. The movie was “The Scarlet Pimpernel” and this particular version (I’m told there is more than one) is told through the eyes of an English fop who goes about rescuing members of the French aristocracy during the French Revolution. The scene is a lavish party in which the Englishman arrives impolitely late. He excuses himself with his usual bravado and over-the-top grandiosity by saying, “Sink me, if you Frenchmen are all not so equal that nobody wants to do the driving anymore.”

Americans have become so indistinguishably equal now that no one wants to drive anything anymore.

The debate about “American exceptionalism” over the past decade is just one, although a troubling one, example of this relatively recent development. Why is it that to suggest that the United States holds some sort of “primacy among peers” role is some sort of blasphemy? American soldiers were primarily (although clearly not solely) responsible for the winning of two world wars. American farmers feed more people than dozens, if not hundreds, of countries combined. When disaster strikes, American reserves and very often American lives are the first to alleviate the resulting misery. American ingenuity and technology drive the world’s economies.

Now – before you get your shorts all in a knot – I am not saying that America is the only country that feeds the homeless, fights in wars to free the oppressed, sends money, material and soldiers to rescue victims of disaster, and that invents all kinds of cool and beneficial products. What I am saying is that, at least for well over the past 100 years, the world has turned to the United States time and time again for help, and the United States has responded positively in virtually every case (alas, many times too late). Why is it considered anathema to be proud of those accomplishments, and our place of power in the world?

Ah, that mean, nasty, ugly, word power. Being exceptional means you have power, and most likely you use that power in an oppressive, unjust manner. Or, the only reason you are exceptional is because you are part of the power-system, which oppresses those who are clearly not exceptional.

Do you have straight “A’s” on your report card, are you on the Dean’s Honor roll? It is because you are privileged, and you are part of the oppression of the average student. Have you climbed the corporate ladder to reach the highest level of management (heaven forbid you become a CEO!)? It is because you have stepped on everyone underneath you, you have built your status with “the man” on the backs of the “people.” Have you worked hard, saved wisely, and can now retire with some measure of financial security? It is because you have stolen your future by oppressing those who do not have what you have. At every turn, those who have worked to obtain some level of exceptionalism at all are denigrated and sometimes attacked, whether physically or by words.

I was reminded of this phenomenon recently in a conversation with a new acquaintance. In a conversation regarding teaching at a university, he said that the concept of the “sage on the stage” is dead. That is, a professor is not supposed to hold his or her advanced knowledge in front of his or her students as some kind of virtue, but rather the professor is supposed to “flip the class” and let the students learn and explore the subject for themselves. Supposedly, this creates smarter students.

Hogwash and poppycock, I say! I am grateful, and increasingly so as I get older, that I was taught by some monumental “sages on the stage.” In fact, as I progressed through my education, those men only climbed higher in my estimation, not lower. They were brilliant – not only in what they had achieved academically, but in the manner in which they presented that material at just the right dose and at just the right time. I thank God none of them tried to “flip the class” while I was learning from them. There is a reason some men and women are exceptional scholars and teachers – and it is not so that they can make their precious little snowflake students feel like they are important!

Strive for mediocrity if you wish. Aim to be average if you must. Set your goal to “boring” and get off the highway to personal improvement at the next exit. As for me, I choose to aim for the exceptional, and then if I fail (ahem, when I fail) at least I will have challenged myself to be the best I can be. I will probably never be thought of as exceptional (except maybe by my dogs, bless their hearts) – but I refuse to acquiesce to the accusation of being mediocre (that’s what my cats are for, just to keep me humble).

May God bless all the exceptional people in my life, and may He bless you with the burning desire to be exceptional in His kingdom!

[By the way – in 1931 Dietrich Bonhoeffer skewered the American education system (primarily the theological educational system) for this exact problem. Compared to his education in Germany, he was shocked at how the American system was designed to be a “cordial exchange of opinions than an undertaking on behalf of knowledge.” So, maybe the drive for exceptionalism in the United States has always had its opponents. However, in some fields it was expected that students would not only strive to be the best, but would actually achieve that goal. See Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Barcelona, Berlin, New York: 1928-1931, Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works (English) Vol. 10, Translated by Douglas W. Stott, p. 305-307.]

Love Letters to a Young Minister (letter 1)

(Note: in this series, which will show up from time to time, I want to address some issues concerning ministry from the point of view of the minister. But I want to do so in a constructive way, the way I wish someone had spoken to me many years ago. I may not have listened then, but just hearing the words might have helped. Feel free to share these words with a young man who is contemplating entering the ministry, or who has just started in ministry. If I just help one young family, I will have accomplished my goal.)

Dear young preacher,

I want you to know I write from love, the kind of love that has walked a mile in the shoes you are trying to wear every Sunday. I want you to know that not everything I will say will apply to you – so pay attention to what you think might fit and throw away the rest. Also, no one person can experience everything, so no doubt you will come across some things that I did not see, hear, or feel. As an old car sales commercial said a long time ago, “Your mileage may vary.” But on the other hand do not be too dismissive. As the inspired preacher once said, what goes around comes around (paraphrased, as you can guess). Nothing is ever entirely new. Life as a minister is always life as a minister.

I want to begin with this letter about your calling, your motivation to become a preacher. To be blunt, what makes you think you can even be a preacher? Has someone told you you should become a preacher because you have a powerful speaking voice? That you have great stage presence? That you have an air of confidence? That you are smart? Maybe even that you are handsome and attract people to you? Congratulations, but don’t think you are a preacher. Don’t get me wrong, these are all wonderful attributes. But none of them qualify you to be a preacher. A good sportscaster on TV, maybe. A preacher, not.

Church members are good at a lot of things, but guessing who will or will not be a good preacher is not one of their better strengths. If it was, every young man who ever stood up on Wednesday night and read a Scripture or led a song would become the next Billy Graham. Preaching – or rather the work of ministry – does not work that way. The world, and that means those who sit in the pew, look at the outside. God looks at the heart. If you do not have the heart for ministry it will not matter how handsome or beguiling your voice is. Your ministry will ultimately fail, no matter how popular you might become. If you have the heart for ministry God will make your service a success, even if you never preach to more than 50 people at a time. Don’t settle for the red stew of popularity if what you are searching for is the birthright of ministry.

Here are some other questions that might be more valuable in helping you decide if ministry is for you: Do people search you out for comfort and advice with their problems? Are you approachable and caring, or cold and prickly? Do you ache when you see someone else hurting? Are you able to just sit in silence with someone, or do you always have to have a quick solution? Can you sit for hours reading and studying out a complex literary problem? (let’s face it, the Bible is literature, if you cannot handle reading and meditation, go for the sportscaster job). Can you take pure, unabashed, venomous criticism and let it fall off your shoulders, or do you get upset if someone criticizes your favorite football team?

I hate to say this so bluntly, buddy, but when Jesus told his disciples to “take up their cross and follow him,” it is in all possibility that he – and they – were looking at a crucified criminal. Whether that is true or not, soon they would be looking at him hanging on that cross. Jesus did not call his disciples to a life of ease and comfort. To be quite honest, it very often hurts to be a minister. Don’t sign up unless you are at least willing to feel the pain.

Our world is up-side-down when it comes to viewing ministry. We look at the “wunderkinder,” the amazing twenty-or-thirty somethings who preach for multi-thousand member congregations as the pinnacle of preaching. Don’t go there. The majority of congregations of the Lord’s people have less than 150 members. Many have less than 100. Sure, some guys get the big gigs. Scratch their life very deep, though, and you might be pretty disgusted by what you uncover. As Jesus once said regarding a certain false piety – they have received their reward. It takes a certain kind of minister to properly lead a congregation of more than 1,000 members. Lord willing you will be there one day. But don’t try to bake a cake in 15 minutes. Take your time. Learn to love people. Learn to love the book. Learn to love God. If he wants you to be in front of a crowd, he will put you there. The cream always does rise to the top of the milk. Dead fish float to the top of the lake, too – so be careful about wanting to be on the top.

Yea, I know this letter has been kind of a downer. But, Jesus was careful to lay out the cost of discipleship before he accepted anyone’s enlistment papers. Take some time and think about you, your wife or girlfriend, your plans, your hopes, your dreams. Ask yourself if you are more interested in hearing the applause of the crowd, or hearing the quiet, “Well done” of your Father in heaven. I have much more to say about the joys, and humor, of preaching. I just wanted to “show my cards,” so to speak, before we get too deep. There will be plenty of time later for the confetti and cake.

Sincerely,

An old friend.

A Deceptive Question

In addition to my daily Bible reading this year, I am reading through the Apocrypha. These books are accepted as canonical by the Roman Catholic Church, and as “valuable, but not inspired” by other groups. My interest in the Apocrypha began a number of years ago, mostly as a tangent from my study of the book of Revelation. So, anyway, today I was reading in the book of Judith. What amazed me in the story is that Judith (the heroine) actually prays to God that he will bless her plans of deception (which, by the way, ultimately lead to murder), and that, because her plans are ultimately successful, the author intends to suggest that God did bless her deception. (For the reference, see Judith 9:10, 13)

The blatant “in your face” aspect of the deception and resulting murder got me to thinking – I can not really recall having a discussion on the “theology” (I know, really bad term, but I can’t think of another) of deception. That got me to try to remember the examples of deception in the Bible – and there are a number of them! (I do not claim this list is exhaustive – just off the top of my head).

  1. Abraham deceives two different individuals regarding his relationship with Sarah.
  2. Isaac makes the same deception regarding Rebekah.
  3. Tamar deceives Judah, and tricks him into committing an incestuous sexual relationship.
  4. Jacob deceives Esau, Isaac, and Laban.
  5. Laban deceives Jacob.
  6. Joseph deceives his brothers, at least initially.
  7. Rahab deceives the men of Jericho.
  8. Jael deceives Sisera, and shortly thereafter murders him.
  9. David and Jonathan deceive Saul regarding David’s absence at King Saul’s feast.
  10. Throughout the period of the Judges, deception is the stock-in-trade of deliverance by the judges.
  11. Saul’s (Paul’s) deliverers help him escape from Damascus through a deceptive maneuver.
  12. Ananias and Sapphira tried their hands at deception, but it did not go very well.

All of this got me to thinking more – At what point does someone have the right to command absolute, unrestricted, complete truthfulness and honesty? One man who did do some extensive thinking about deception was Dietrich Bonhoeffer. His answer would not please very many people, I am afraid. He concluded that there are some people in this world that simply do not deserve an honest answer, or an honest relationship. Consider for example the whole idea of war – does a general have the responsibility to reveal his plans to his enemy? What about prisoners of war – are they obligated to reveal everything they know regarding plans and tactics to their captors? What about the situation in which an enemy asks about the whereabouts of innocent lives – is there a universal principle dictating that such hiding places be revealed, even if it means certain death to the innocent victims?

I know there are many who believe in the hard and fast rule that no lie, no deception, is ever permissible.

I know there are others who believe that any lie is a good one if it protects you or your loved one.

What I have never experienced is an honest-to-God discussion and examination of the concept of deception, and how we as disciples of Christ are to respond in situations that have no clear-cut answers. Let’s be perfectly honest here, in a number of situations listed above, God not only blesses the deceiver – the Scripture makes it clear that the innocent victim of the deception would be dealt with in a more severe manner if they actively pursued the seeming result of the deception! (See Abraham’s and Isaac’s deceptions in particular).

I have my own thoughts regarding this question – but I am wondering – what say you? Have you thought much about the question of deceptive actions in the Bible (and outright lies)? How would you answer the question – is it ever permissible, even expected, to lie or deceive another person?

I’d appreciate hearing what you have to say!

Abraham – Prophet of God

I learned something today in my daily Bible reading that (1) opened up a new line of thought for me and (2) simply reaffirmed how important it is to read the Bible continually lest we think we know everything about everything. My apologies to those of you who have already seen/learned/known this; I’m not the sharpest bulb in the litter, so excuse my excitement for a few moments as I ponder this observation.

The text I came across in my assigned reading included these verses:

The LORD said, “Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do, seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him? For I have chosen him, that he may command his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice, so that the LORD may bring to Abraham what he has promised him.” (Genesis 18:17-19 ESV)

Now, for a number of decades now I have interpreted the LORD’s decision to inform Abraham of His plans to be based on the future role of Abraham – the fact that he would surely become a great and mighty nation and so on. But today, for some inexplicable reason, my mind immediately recalled the words of Amos:

For the LORD God does nothing without revealing his secret to his servants the prophets. The lion has roared; who will not fear? The LORD God has spoken; who can but prophesy? (Amos 3:7-8 ESV)

How odd, I thought, for God to feel like he had to reveal his “secret” to Abraham, because the language sounded just like the LORD was including Abraham as one of his prophets.

Then, no sooner had I taken a sip of coffee and turned the page, I read this:

Now then, return the man’s wife, for he is a prophet, so that he will pray for you, and you shall live. But if you do not return her, know that you shall surely die, you and all who are yours. (Genesis 20:7 ESV, emphasis mine)

The conversation is between the LORD and Abimelech (who had been duped into believing Sarah was an available bachelorette by the aforementioned Abraham). Yes, the liar (okay, half-liar, but he did it twice, so that makes him a whole liar) is a prophet; and not only a prophet, but one who was chosen by God to become a great nation and through whom all spiritual blessings would descend. And here is the kicker – Abraham is to fulfill his role by “command[ing] his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice.” Not bad for a man who has a singular inability to admit his wife is indeed his wife, and who will have just as much trouble ruling his household without some dysfunctional moments.

Okay, so I learned more than one thing this morning. Abraham is arguably the first “prophet” of God. And, as trite as it may sound, even prophets of God stub their toes now and again when it comes to promoting “righteousness and justice.”

Sort of reminds me that we all, prophets or not, are made of clay; and regardless of our desire, some days our calling exceeds our obeying.

 

America: Land of the Soft and Home of the Victim

I begin my 2017 musings in a minor key, but addressing an issue that I believe is important if Americans in general, and Christians in particular, are going to make any kind of difference in the world today. If you narrow the audience down to members of the Churches of Christ, then I would say this topic rises to the level of urgent, if not critical.

I shall begin by posing a question (two actually): When, and how, did Americans become so soft? How is it that we have become a nation of victims?

I recently viewed a video clip of some twenty or thirty something year old who was discussing the issue of the problems facing millennials (the generation born in the 1990’s and into the 2000’s). He was making some really good points: this generation was raised by parents using a defective parenting philosophy. This was the generation that was told it was impossible to “lose” and that no one was “superior.” Everyone gets a trophy or a medal, no matter if you come in first or last. Parents were told to become their children’s best friends, and the child’s self-esteem is the be-all and end-all of parenting. Also, technology has had a significant impact on this generation – from smart phones to iPads to social media platforms, this generation is truly drowning in technological inventions. This has created an entire set of social problems – a millennial can have hundreds of “friends” and thousands of “likes,” and yet be utterly alone and bereft of any social skills whatsoever. Additionally, this is the age of instant gratification. From microwave ovens to instantaneous download speeds, this generation simply does not know how to wait. Patience? That is so yesterday – or worse.

Then, just when I thought the speaker was on to something, he launched into a blistering indictment of modern culture and how “we” were going to have to act if this generation was to be salvaged. “We” (and I’m not really sure who he was speaking to, although corporate America seemed to be the general focus of his tirade) are going to have to change everything so that this generation can cope. These poor little darlings are so fragile, so soft, that any challenge to their survival is going to have to be overcome by anyone and everyone who is not a millennial (because, obviously, the millennials did not create any of these problems, so how can they be expected to solve them?)

Assuming his earlier points were valid (and I thought he was pretty astute), let me ask a few follow-up questions:

  • Which generation alive today was raised by perfect parents? I defy you – no generation has been perfect, and every generation has had to deal with dysfunctional family situations.
  • Which generation has not been told they are brighter and smarter and more likely to succeed than their parents? In other words, which generation has been told they are the one exclusion of the evolutionary family tree? I posit that none have been.
  • Which generation has not been significantly impacted by technology? My grandfather, for instance, was born before the Wright brothers made their first flight, yet he lived to see Neil Armstrong walk on the moon. Can any millennial claim to have witnessed that kind of technological leap? I dare say, NO.
  • Which generation alive today was not handed a critical, life changing and potentially world altering political crisis? I would suggest there is only one – the one generation that claims to have had life the worst – the millennials. World War 1 and 2, Korea, Vietnam – these were real shooting wars, and the last three involved the use (or at least the potential use) of atomic weapons, so, please, do not tell me that the events of 9/11/01 or the election of Donald Trump qualifies as a real crisis.

I think I could go on, but I hope you get the point. The millennial generation is no worse off, and in a number of ways is so much safer and more prosperous, than any generation in recent memory. Yet, to hear the majority of Americans talk today, you would think we are the most impoverished, insulted, abused, and persecuted culture to have ever existed. How did we get so soft?

And, lest you think I am drawing a line of distinction around Christians, think again. Just let someone say, “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas” and you would think Adolf Hitler himself had been resurrected. Persecuted?? Because prayer has been taken out of public schools?? Because homosexuals have been granted the “right” to get married?? From what I hear from a lot of “Christians,” prayer has been removed from a lot of churches and “Christians” have long been trashing the sanctity of marriage as well, but I suppose that is a rabbit that will better be chased on another day.

My point is that we, as Americans – and that includes Christians equally, if not more – have raised victimology to a fine art. Everyone is offended by everything these days. Political correctness has not only destroyed higher education (exhibit “A” – the number of colleges and universities that had a collective emotional melt-down the day after the general election), but it has permeated and is in the process of destroying the church as well. Preachers should not be worried about Hollywood or Washington telling them what they can or cannot preach – they should be worried about the members in the pews who do not know the definition of the word “sin” or the significance of Jesus’s death on the cross. Jesus did not die because humankind was perfect – he died so that his disciples might be made perfect. And the only way his disciples can be made perfect is to die themselves – die to the world that is so blatantly seeking to destroy the church today.

I have no idea what the future holds for America. Politically and socially we are on a downward trajectory and I personally see no reversal in the near future. If we continue this head-long plunge into narcissism I fear for the future of the Republic. However, we as a nation have proven ourselves to be incredibly resilient against a number of enemies, so maybe we can overcome our own seeming desire for self-annihilation as well.

As regards the church, this I know for sure. We will not be able to save ourselves. Humankind never has, and never will be able, to overcome this depth of fatal self-absorption. We are going to have to return to being a people of the cross – that horrible symbol of God’s judgment on human hubris – if we are going to have any meaningful message to speak to the world.

In the vernacular of the day, we are going to have to put on our big boy pants and suck it up, buttercup. We are not the victims, we are the sinners. We, the church, collectively and individually as members of it, are all “miserable sinners” (in the words of the older Anglican confession. Sadly, even that has been modernized.). We are going to have to start preaching against sin and we are going to have to start practicing both positive and negative church discipline. If we (the church) had been faithful to our mission we (society as a whole) would not be in the mess we are in now. So, let’s be honest with ourselves, honest with God, and honest with the world.

Let us pray that in 2017 we can have the courage to stop being victims, and start being responsible disciples of Christ.

Correction, Confrontation is not Condemnation

Another day, another urgent summons for the Churches of Christ to be less judgmental, less condemning. These sermons and blog posts and on-line articles are ubiquitous these days. It would seem that if you are a minister within the Churches of Christ and you want to become popular (or maintain your popularity) you need to hop on the “bash the church” bandwagon. Pardon me for being a knuckle-dragging troglodyte, but I’ll just let that cart go on by.

It may just be me, but I find it funny (in a serious way) that if a financial advisor corrected our faulty thinking about our retirement plans we would be most appreciative. If we were working with explosive chemicals in a science class and our teacher warned us before we made a pyro-technic mistake, we would say, “thank-you.” If we were applying for a music scholarship and a master musician took us into his or her personal study for an hour’s worth of instruction, we would not be able to stop thanking him or her. But, you let one word of spiritual correction or constructive criticism come from a preacher associated with the Churches of Christ and he is immediately tarred and feathered as a judgmental Pharisee. “Quit being so condemning” is the shrill response. “Don’t you know everyone that says they love Jesus is saved, and who are you to say you know everything about the Bible.”

I won’t be the first to admit that our heritage is full of characters that had more fist than finesse when it comes to biblical conversations. Neither will I be the first to condemn that behavior. Regrettably it is still visible today. Every family has its cranky uncle Joe, and there are are a number of reasons why combative individuals are drawn to independent congregations (and Churches of Christ are NOT alone in this regard!!)

But I truly fail to see where teaching some basic Bible doctrines should be considered judgmental, unless the person listening refuses to accept those teachings, yet recognizes the seriousness of the issue under discussion.

Actually, every person – unless they are a true universalist – will draw some line at some place in regard to what makes a person a Christian, what constitutes acceptable worship, and how a person ought to live a life committed to Christ. Why is drawing one line at baptism considered judgmental when drawing that line at the “sinner’s prayer” not considered judgmental? Why is adult believer’s baptism considered judgmental when infant baptism is not? The same point could be made with acapella worship, praise teams but no instrumental music, acoustic instruments but not amplified instruments, classic or contemporary songs, high church/low church or just about every other issue that causes conflict in a congregation.

I do not need, nor do I want, to be told that I need to be “more accepting” of individuals who disagree with me on basic, fundamental teachings in Scripture. The only words I need to accept are the words of the inspired authors of the Bible. Do I need to study, to learn, to read, to hear other points of view – absolutely! I try to do so as much or more than many ministers within the Churches of Christ. But the point of reference that I use to judge if what I am hearing is true is a convergence with the Bible – NOT some touchy-feely idea such as “they love Jesus.”

“Come, let us reason together” is a solid biblical concept. If I disagree with an individual there can be only one of three conclusions – either I am right and the other person is wrong, I am wrong and the other person is right, or we are both equally right and equally wrong. If I am willing to admit my culpability in drawing wrong conclusions from Scripture, I cannot be blamed for suggesting that those who disagree with me can also possibly be in error. I may seek to teach, and perhaps also to confront, but that does NOT make me a judgmental, hypocritical, Pharisee.

Unless, of course, you believe that Jesus was a judgmental, hypocritical, Pharisee as well. As I read the gospels, he had to try to straighten out quite a few twisted twigs during his ministry. Although he corrected, he never condemned honest error – but he was quite emphatic in his rejection of obstinate dismissal of God’s will.

As I have written numerous times – if I am wrong please show me my error! I never want to teach something that is false, either knowingly or unwittingly. And I promise I will not call you judgmental.

Where Have All the Christians Gone?

Where have all the soldiers gone,
Long time passing?
Where have all the soldiers gone,
Long time ago.
Where have all the soldiers gone –
Gone to graveyards every one.
When will they ever learn?
Oh when will they ever learn?
(1960’s folk scare anthem, titled, Where Have All the Flowers Gone? third verse)

I picture a scene in the late 1930’s in Berlin. It is a picture of two worlds. On the one hand an economy that was literally on the brink of disaster is now starting to show signs, not just of life, but of genuine health. The mood of the nation borders on ecstasy. The long, dark night following the embarrassment of the Great World War is fading into the dark recesses of history. People are working. There is food on the table. Instead of a waffling, insecure national government, there is a leader who knows what he wants to do – he knows what is best for his Volk, his people. He is their leader, der Fuhrer.*

Crouched over a simple wood desk a young pastor and sometimes university lecturer looks out his window overlooking Berlin and wrinkles his forehead. Through his spectacles he sees a much different Germany. The bright red, white and black swastikas that hang from the government buildings, as well as from many of the church buildings, do not indicate wholeness to him, but rather a terminal sickness. Rather than a facile prosperity, he sees the war machine fueling the new economy. Rather than unity and a restored pride in German law, he sees the systematic dismantling of basic human freedoms. As a country rises like a phoenix from the ashes, he watches a culture begin to burn with the most acrid fires of hell. And he wonders, where is the church? Where are the Christians? The church buildings appear to be full – but where is the faith? Where are those willing to follow their Lord to the cross?

America in the second decade of the 21st century shares far more in common with Germany in the 4th decade of the 20th century than many people are aware of, or are willing to admit (and, no, I am not trying to be sensational here, just point out some disturbing historical parallels). Our most recent economic scare, the “Great Recession” has long since faded from our (increasingly deficient) memory. Ever since September 11, 2001 our federal government has incrementally but steadily become more monolithic and focused on the person of the president. What once was a trip-partite “sharing of the powers” has become a totally inefficient and inept Congress and a judiciary that is nothing but a docile lapdog of the most liberal and leftist agenda. Our current president, and both of the nominees of the two major parties, have made it abundantly clear that they do not respect the constitutional separation of powers, but that, as the elected president, they will be the de-facto fuhrer of the American people.

Morally the country is in a complete free fall. No, we are not emptying neighborhoods of “undesirables” and shipping them off to death camps. But that quaint little concept of “freedom of speech” is fast becoming a relic to be studied in a museum. Do you think we are a country of laws, and not of personal privilege? Compare the story of a baker or a photographer who decline to participate in the wedding of a homosexual couple, only to be sued into oblivion, to the story of a sovereign state, the duly elected officials of which pass a law that protects the rights of individuals to exercise their religious freedoms, only to see one of the largest corporations in the country discriminate against them by removing one of their largest celebrations from the state. Who gets the praise here – those who practice their religious rights, their freedom of speech, or the state, (or corporation) that uses their legal or economic power to bully the other into submission? From newspaper editorials to talk shows to political pundits – the voice of those who defend perversity and attack those who stand for Christian morality is almost universal.

The tragedy here, from a biblical standpoint, is that the church has become utterly complicit in this decay. Instead of a clear voice (remember Amos?) all we here from the collective pulpit of American Christianity is, “Don’t say anything offensive!” “Scientists say they can’t change, so we should not burden them with guilt!” “We have to make the gospel relevant, and telling people about sin just does not communicate anymore!” I guess the worst is, “If we tell people they have to change, they might leave the church!” Yea, right. As if having them in the church is doing them or the church any good.

It’s called SIN, people. Sin in the world, sin in the church, sin in you, sin in me.

What we need is for the church – for disciples of Christ – to stand up with a unified voice and condemn that sin. Condemn the sin in the world, condemn the sin in the church, condemn the sin in us – you and me.

Despite the efforts of the young pastor – and hundreds like him – the church in Germany chose either to remain mostly silent – or to actively support the fuhrer – and the world erupted into another hell of war. Those who refuse to learn the lessons of history are doomed to repeat them.

So, I ask – Where have all the Christians gone, long time passing . . . 

*Fuhrer (with the umlaut, which I cannot seem to figure out how to insert over the “u”, simply means “leader” in German.)

The Question of Becoming

Okay, really short post today! I was reading in Clark Pinnock’s book, Most Moved Mover, when I came across this quote –

The element of risk may belong to the time of our earthly probation and our ability to choose may diminish; as choices become habits, habits become character, and character becomes our very being. In a sense, we are becoming our choices. (Clark H. Pinnock, Most Moved Mover: A Theology of God’s Openness, Baker Academic, 2001, p. 171.)

I’m going to let this one simmer for a little while, but I will probably come back to this quote in future posts. In the meantime, I think it is enough to ask, “What are you becoming?”

 

 

Live and in Living Color!

And now, the moment you have all been waiting for – okay maybe not all of you, and maybe not THE moment you have been waiting for . . . but here it is anyway!

Thanks to my lovely wife and the talents and kind assistance of one of our members, here is a video of the latest attempt at a sermon by the ol’ Freightdawg.

Anyone needing (or just wanting) a new preacher – feel free to share.

Thanks, and as always, I appreciate your companionship in the fog . . .

Paul

Acceptance, or Approval?

Sometimes I wonder what people think about me. At other times I’m fairly certain, but I try not to think about those times. Specifically, I wonder what people think about me when I stress the significance of the meaning of similar, but ultimately different, words. I imagine most people think I’m a nut. Who cares what words mean? A word means what I want it to mean, so just get over it.

Well, I am an inveterate lover of words, so I cannot just “get over it.”

So, I was reading a commentary today in which the author made several references to Jesus “accepting” sinners. Every time he used the word “accept” or “acceptance” I cringed and made a little comment in the margin of the book. (I am always correcting authors when they make mistakes. Hopefully, none of them will ever see my corrections.) Something made me pause and ponder for a moment why it was that I was so put-out with the word “acceptance.” I realized that I was reacting against what I perceive to be the modern connotation of the word. When I hear the word accept used today it is virtually always used in the context of approval. When someone suggests that I “accept” a particular viewpoint or choice of behavior, they are not suggesting that I simply recognize the behavior and move on. That person (or persons) want me to approve the behavior or ideology. So, when I read the author’s continued use of the word “accept” for Jesus’s association with sinners, all I could think of was that the author was trying to communicate that Jesus saw nothing wrong with the behavior of the people he chose, or allowed, to be around. That grated on my nerves – and still does, for that matter.

The meanings of words change with time. Take, for one tragic example, the word “gay.” It used to mean “happy, carefree, exuberant, joyful.” Now it means – well, you know what it means. I fear that the word “acceptance” or “accept” has changed as well. Maybe it is just me, but I cannot accept (pardon the pun) that a lifestyle of sexual depravity is normal or – to use a word to define a word – “acceptable.” In other words, I cannot approve of a lifestyle that is condemned in Scripture – and that would include lifestyles marked by any of the “works of the flesh.” Sin still has to be sin; otherwise the sacrifice of Jesus becomes far less than divine, indeed it becomes positively diabolical.

I want to acknowledge that Jesus freely associated with those that the Pharisees referred to as “sinners.” Some of those people were truly rebellious against God – and some probably just did not wash their hands before supper. But I struggle with the modern connotation of the word “accept.” He recognized sinners, freely associated with sinners, even perhaps welcomed sinners – but in absolutely no way, shape, or form did he ever approve of their sinful behavior.

Maybe I am making a mountain out of a molehill, straining a gnat while trying to swallow a camel. As one whose life depends upon the correct usage and understanding of words, however, I must urge caution when certain words are used in relation to the life and teachings of Jesus. We may intend to mean one thing, and our audience may hear something entirely different. I suppose to a certain degree this is unavoidable – but we do not need to carelessly compound the issue.

Thanks for flying in the fog today – I hope you will excuse me, I need to get back to correcting some more authors.

%d bloggers like this: